To point a rope

To point a rope
Point Point (point), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Pointed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Pointing}.] [Cf. F. pointer. See {Point}, n.] 1. To give a point to; to sharpen; to cut, forge, grind, or file to an acute end; as, to point a dart, or a pencil. Used also figuratively; as, to point a moral. [1913 Webster]

2. To direct toward an abject; to aim; as, to point a gun at a wolf, or a cannon at a fort. [1913 Webster]

3. Hence, to direct the attention or notice of. [1913 Webster]

Whosoever should be guided through his battles by Minerva, and pointed to every scene of them. --Pope. [1913 Webster]

4. To supply with punctuation marks; to punctuate; as, to point a composition. [1913 Webster]

5. To mark (a text, as in Arabic or Hebrew) with {vowel points}; -- also called {vocalize}.

Syn: vocalize. [1913 Webster + RP]

6. To give particular prominence to; to designate in a special manner; to indicate, as if by pointing; as, the error was pointed out. --Pope. [1913 Webster]

He points it, however, by no deviation from his straightforward manner of speech. --Dickens. [1913 Webster]

7. To indicate or discover by a fixed look, as game. [1913 Webster]

8. (Masonry) To fill up and finish the joints of (a wall), by introducing additional cement or mortar, and bringing it to a smooth surface. [1913 Webster]

9. (Stone Cutting) To cut, as a surface, with a pointed tool. [1913 Webster]

{To point a rope} (Naut.), to taper and neatly finish off the end by interweaving the nettles.

{To point a sail} (Naut.), to affix points through the eyelet holes of the reefs.

{To point off}, to divide into periods or groups, or to separate, by pointing, as figures.

{To point the yards} (of a vessel) (Naut.), to brace them so that the wind shall strike the sails obliquely. --Totten. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

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  • Point — (point), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Pointed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Pointing}.] [Cf. F. pointer. See {Point}, n.] 1. To give a point to; to sharpen; to cut, forge, grind, or file to an acute end; as, to point a dart, or a pencil. Used also figuratively; as …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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  • To point a sail — Point Point (point), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Pointed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Pointing}.] [Cf. F. pointer. See {Point}, n.] 1. To give a point to; to sharpen; to cut, forge, grind, or file to an acute end; as, to point a dart, or a pencil. Used also… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • To point off — Point Point (point), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Pointed}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Pointing}.] [Cf. F. pointer. See {Point}, n.] 1. To give a point to; to sharpen; to cut, forge, grind, or file to an acute end; as, to point a dart, or a pencil. Used also… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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