Blasting

Blasting
Blasting Blast"ing, n. 1. A blast; destruction by a blast, or by some pernicious cause. [1913 Webster]

I have smitten you with blasting and mildew. --Amos iv. 9. [1913 Webster]

2. The act or process of one who, or that which, blasts; the business of one who blasts. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Blasting — Blast Blast, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Blasted}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Blasting}.] 1. To injure, as by a noxious wind; to cause to wither; to stop or check the growth of, and prevent from fruit bearing, by some pernicious influence; to blight; to shrivel.… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Blasting gelatin — Gelatin Gel a*tin, Gelatine Gel a*tine, n. [F. g[ e]latine, fr. L. gelare to congeal. See {Geal}.] (Chem.) Animal jelly; glutinous material obtained from animal tissues by prolonged boiling. Specifically (Physiol. Chem.), a nitrogeneous colloid,… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Acrocephalus streperus — Reed Reed, n. [AS. hre[ o]d; akin to D. riet, G. riet, ried, OHG. kriot, riot.] 1. (Bot.) A name given to many tall and coarse grasses or grasslike plants, and their slender, often jointed, stems, such as the various kinds of bamboo, and… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Aiguille — Ai guille , n. [F., a needle. See {Aglet}.] 1. A needle shaped peak. [1913 Webster] 2. An instrument for boring holes, used in blasting. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Alliaria officinalis — Jack Jack (j[a^]k), n. [F. Jacques James, L. Jacobus, Gr. ?, Heb. Ya aq[=o]b Jacob; prop., seizing by the heel; hence, a supplanter. Cf. {Jacobite}, {Jockey}.] [1913 Webster] 1. A familiar nickname of, or substitute for, John. [1913 Webster] You… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Ammophila arundinacea — Reed Reed, n. [AS. hre[ o]d; akin to D. riet, G. riet, ried, OHG. kriot, riot.] 1. (Bot.) A name given to many tall and coarse grasses or grasslike plants, and their slender, often jointed, stems, such as the various kinds of bamboo, and… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Arabis lyrata — Rock Rock, n. [OF. roke, F. roche; cf. Armor. roc h, and AS. rocc.] 1. A large concreted mass of stony material; a large fixed stone or crag. See {Stone}. [1913 Webster] Come one, come all! this rock shall fly From its firm base as soon as I. Sir …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Arabis petraea — Rock Rock, n. [OF. roke, F. roche; cf. Armor. roc h, and AS. rocc.] 1. A large concreted mass of stony material; a large fixed stone or crag. See {Stone}. [1913 Webster] Come one, come all! this rock shall fly From its firm base as soon as I. Sir …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Armstrong gun — Gun Gun (g[u^]n), n. [OE. gonne, gunne; of uncertain origin; cf. Ir., Gael., & LL. gunna, W. gum; possibly (like cannon) fr. L. canna reed, tube; or abbreviated fr. OF. mangonnel, E. mangonel, a machine for hurling stones.] 1. A weapon which… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Atlas — At las, n.; pl. {Atlases}. [L. Atlas, antis, Gr. ?, ?, one of the older family of gods, who bears up the pillars of heaven; also Mt. Atlas, in W. Africa, regarded as the pillar of heaven. It is from the root of tlh^nai to bear. See {Tolerate}.] 1 …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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