Or

Or
Or Or ([^o]r), conj. [OE. or, outher, other, auther, either, or, AS. [=a]w[eth]er, contr. from [=a]hw[ae][eth]er; [=a] aye + hw[ae][eth]er whether. See {Aye}, and {Whether}, and cf. {Either}.] A particle that marks an alternative; as, you may read or may write, -- that is, you may do one of the things at your pleasure, but not both. It corresponds to {either}. You may ride either to London or to Windsor. It often connects a series of words or propositions, presenting a choice of either; as, he may study law, or medicine, or divinity, or he may enter into trade. [1913 Webster]

If man's convenience, health, Or safety interfere, his rights and claims Are paramount. --Cowper. [1913 Webster]

Note: Or may be used to join as alternatives terms expressing unlike things or ideas (as, is the orange sour or sweet?), or different terms expressing the same thing or idea; as, this is a sphere, or globe. [1913 Webster]

Note: Or sometimes begins a sentence. In this case it expresses an alternative or subjoins a clause differing from the foregoing. ``Or what man is there of you, who, if his son shall ask him for a loaf, will give him a stone?'' --Matt. vii. 9 (Rev. Ver.). [1913 Webster] Or for either is archaic or poetic. [1913 Webster]

Maugre thine heed, thou must for indigence Or steal, or beg, or borrow thy dispence. --Chaucer. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

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