To fall off

To fall off
Off Off ([o^]f; 115), adv. [OE. of, orig. the same word as R. of, prep., AS. of, adv. & prep. [root]194. See {Of}.] In a general sense, denoting from or away from; as: [1913 Webster]

1. Denoting distance or separation; as, the house is a mile off. [1913 Webster]

2. Denoting the action of removing or separating; separation; as, to take off the hat or cloak; to cut off, to pare off, to clip off, to peel off, to tear off, to march off, to fly off, and the like. [1913 Webster]

3. Denoting a leaving, abandonment, departure, abatement, interruption, or remission; as, the fever goes off; the pain goes off; the game is off; all bets are off. [1913 Webster]

4. Denoting a different direction; not on or towards: away; as, to look off. [1913 Webster]

5. Denoting opposition or negation. [Obs.] [1913 Webster]

The questions no way touch upon puritanism, either off or on. --Bp. Sanderson. [1913 Webster]

{From off}, off from; off. ``A live coal . . . taken with the tongs from off the altar.'' --Is. vi. 6.

{Off and on}. (a) Not constantly; not regularly; now and then; occasionally. (b) (Naut.) On different tacks, now toward, and now away from, the land.

{To be off}. (a) To depart; to escape; as, he was off without a moment's warning. (b) To be abandoned, as an agreement or purpose; as, the bet was declared to be off. [Colloq.]

{To come off}, {To cut off}, {To fall off}, {To go off}, etc. See under {Come}, {Cut}, {Fall}, {Go}, etc.

{To get off}. (a) To utter; to discharge; as, to get off a joke. (b) To go away; to escape; as, to get off easily from a trial. [Colloq.]

{To take off} {To do a take-off on}, {To take off}, to mimic, lampoon, or impersonate.

{To tell off} (a) (Mil.), to divide and practice a regiment or company in the several formations, preparatory to marching to the general parade for field exercises. --Farrow. (b) to rebuke (a person) for an improper action; to scold; to reprimand.

{To be well off}, to be in good condition.

{To be ill off}, {To be badly off}, to be in poor condition. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • fall-off — fallˈ off noun A decrease • • • Main Entry: ↑fall * * * fall off UK US noun [singular] a reduction in the amount or level of something a fall off in sales Thesaurus: rates of decrease and the process of decreasingsynonym …   Useful english dictionary

  • fall-off — also .falling off BrE n [singular] a decrease in the level, amount, or number of something = ↑fall ≠ ↑rise fall off in ▪ a fall off in profits …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • fall-off — UK US noun [C] ► a reduction in something such as profits, sales, etc.: a fall off in sth »The company blamed the fall off in profits on higher operating expenses …   Financial and business terms

  • fall-off — fall ,off noun singular a reduction in the amount or level of something: a fall off in sales …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • fall off your perch — fall off (your) perch British, old fashioned, humorous to die. By the time I fall off my perch, Britain may well be a republic …   New idioms dictionary

  • fall off perch — fall off (your) perch British, old fashioned, humorous to die. By the time I fall off my perch, Britain may well be a republic …   New idioms dictionary

  • fall off — See: DROP OFF(4) …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • fall off — See: DROP OFF(4) …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • fall off the turnip truck — (USA) If someone has just fallen off the turnip truck, they are uninformed, naive and gullible. (Often used in the negative) …   The small dictionary of idiomes

  • fall off the wagon — If someone falls off the wagon, they start drinking after having given up completely for a time …   The small dictionary of idiomes

  • fall off — index decrease, degenerate, ebb, subside Burton s Legal Thesaurus. William C. Burton. 2006 …   Law dictionary

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