To find one's self

To find one's self
Find Find (f[imac]nd), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Found} (found); p. pr. & vb. n. {Finding}.] [AS. findan; akin to D. vinden, OS. & OHG. findan, G. finden, Dan. finde, icel. & Sw. finna, Goth. fin[thorn]an; and perh. to L. petere to seek, Gr. pi`ptein to fall, Skr. pat to fall, fly, E. petition.] 1. To meet with, or light upon, accidentally; to gain the first sight or knowledge of, as of something new, or unknown; hence, to fall in with, as a person. [1913 Webster]

Searching the window for a flint, I found This paper, thus sealed up. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

In woods and forests thou art found. --Cowley. [1913 Webster]

2. To learn by experience or trial; to perceive; to experience; to discover by the intellect or the feelings; to detect; to feel. ``I find you passing gentle.'' --Shak. [1913 Webster]

The torrid zone is now found habitable. --Cowley. [1913 Webster]

3. To come upon by seeking; as, to find something lost. (a) To discover by sounding; as, to find bottom. (b) To discover by study or experiment direct to an object or end; as, water is found to be a compound substance. (c) To gain, as the object of desire or effort; as, to find leisure; to find means. (d) To attain to; to arrive at; to acquire. [1913 Webster]

Seek, and ye shall find. --Matt. vii. 7. [1913 Webster]

Every mountain now hath found a tongue. --Byron. [1913 Webster]

4. To provide for; to supply; to furnish; as, to find food for workemen; he finds his nephew in money. [1913 Webster]

Wages [pounds]14 and all found. --London Times. [1913 Webster]

Nothing a day and find yourself. --Dickens. [1913 Webster]

5. To arrive at, as a conclusion; to determine as true; to establish; as, to find a verdict; to find a true bill (of indictment) against an accused person. [1913 Webster]

To find his title with some shows of truth. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

{To find out}, to detect (a thief); to discover (a secret) -- to solve or unriddle (a parable or enigma); to understand. ``Canst thou by searching find out God?'' --Job. xi. 7. ``We do hope to find out all your tricks.'' --Milton.

{To find fault with}, to blame; to censure.

{To find one's self}, to be; to fare; -- often used in speaking of health; as, how do you find yourself this morning? [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

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