To slight off

To slight off
Slight Slight, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Slighted}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Slighting}.] To disregard, as of little value and unworthy of notice; to make light of; as, to slight the divine commands. --Milton. [1913 Webster]

The wretch who slights the bounty of the skies. --Cowper. [1913 Webster]

{To slight off}, to treat slightingly; to drive off; to remove. [R.] -- {To slight over}, to run over in haste; to perform superficially; to treat carelessly; as, to slight over a theme. ``They will but slight it over.'' --Bacon. [1913 Webster]

Syn: To neglect; disregard; disdain; scorn.

Usage: {Slight}, {Neglect}. To slight is stronger than to neglect. We may neglect a duty or person from inconsiderateness, or from being over-occupied in other concerns. To slight is always a positive and intentional act, resulting from feelings of dislike or contempt. We ought to put a kind construction on what appears neglect on the part of a friend; but when he slights us, it is obvious that he is our friend no longer. [1913 Webster]

Beware . . . lest the like befall . . . If they transgress and slight that sole command. --Milton. [1913 Webster]

This my long-sufferance, and my day of grace, Those who neglect and scorn shall never taste. --Milton. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Игры ⚽ Поможем написать реферат

Look at other dictionaries:

  • slight off — (Shakespeare) To put off, set aside, with contempt • • • Main Entry: ↑slight …   Useful english dictionary

  • Slight — Slight, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Slighted}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Slighting}.] To disregard, as of little value and unworthy of notice; to make light of; as, to slight the divine commands. Milton. [1913 Webster] The wretch who slights the bounty of the… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • slight — [adj1] insignificant, small fat, feeble, inconsiderable, insubstantial, meager, minor, modest, negligible, off, outside, paltry, petty, piddling, remote, scanty, slender, slim, sparse, superficial, trifling, trivial, unessential, unimportant,… …   New thesaurus

  • Slight Rebellion off Madison — is a short story written by J. D. Salinger for the December 22, 1946 issue of The New Yorker. It was to become the basis for his famous novel The Catcher in the Rye , which contains a modified version of Slight Rebellion off Madison as chapter 17 …   Wikipedia

  • off — [adj1] gone; remote absent, canceled, finished, inoperative, negligible, not employed, not on duty, on vacation, outside, postponed, slender, slight, slim, small, unavailable; concept 552 Ant. here, present off [adj2] inferior; spoiled bad,… …   New thesaurus

  • To slight over — Slight Slight, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Slighted}; p. pr. & vb. n. {Slighting}.] To disregard, as of little value and unworthy of notice; to make light of; as, to slight the divine commands. Milton. [1913 Webster] The wretch who slights the bounty of …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • slight — 1. adjective 1) the chance of success is slight Syn: small, modest, tiny, minute, inappreciable, negligible, insignificant, minimal, remote, slim, faint; informal minuscule; formal exiguous Ant: considerable 2) …   Thesaurus of popular words

  • Off-roading — A Land Rover Defender 90 off roading Off roading is a term for driving a vehicle on unsurfaced roads or tracks, made of materials such as sand, gravel, riverbeds, mud, snow, rocks, and other natural terrain. Contents 1 …   Wikipedia

  • off — I. adverb Etymology: Middle English of, from Old English more at of Date: before 12th century 1. a. (1) from a place or position < march off >; specifically away from land < ship stood off to sea > (2) …   New Collegiate Dictionary

  • off — Synonyms and related words: aberrant, abnormal, abroad, absonant, absurd, adrift, adulterated, all abroad, all off, all wrong, aloof, amiss, askew, astray, at a distance, at fault, at leisure, at liberty, at loose ends, atonal, available, away,… …   Moby Thesaurus

Share the article and excerpts

Direct link
Do a right-click on the link above
and select “Copy Link”