To stick to

To stick to
Stick Stick, v. i. 1. To adhere; as, glue sticks to the fingers; paste sticks to the wall. [1913 Webster]

The green caterpillar breedeth in the inward parts of roses not blown, where the dew sticketh. --Bacon. [1913 Webster]

2. To remain where placed; to be fixed; to hold fast to any position so as to be moved with difficulty; to cling; to abide; to cleave; to be united closely. [1913 Webster]

A friend that sticketh closer than a brother. --Prov. xviii. 24. [1913 Webster]

I am a kind of bur; I shall stick. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

If on your fame our sex a bolt has thrown, 'T will ever stick through malice of your own. --Young. [1913 Webster]

3. To be prevented from going farther; to stop by reason of some obstacle; to be stayed. [1913 Webster]

I had most need of blessing, and ``Amen'' Stuck in my throat. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

The trembling weapon passed Through nine bull hides, . . . and stuck within the last. --Dryden. [1913 Webster]

4. To be embarrassed or puzzled; to hesitate; to be deterred, as by scruples; to scruple; -- often with at. [1913 Webster]

They will stick long at part of a demonstration for want of perceiving the connection of two ideas. --Locke. [1913 Webster]

Some stick not to say, that the parson and attorney forged a will. --Arbuthnot. [1913 Webster]

5. To cause difficulties, scruples, or hesitation. [1913 Webster]

This is the difficulty that sticks with the most reasonable. --Swift. [1913 Webster]

{To stick by}. (a) To adhere closely to; to be firm in supporting. ``We are your only friends; stick by us, and we will stick by you.'' --Davenant. (b) To be troublesome by adhering. ``I am satisfied to trifle away my time, rather than let it stick by me.'' --Pope.

{To stick out}. (a) To project; to be prominent. ``His bones that were not seen stick out.'' --Job xxxiii. 21. (b) To persevere in a purpose; to hold out; as, the garrison stuck out until relieved. [Colloq.]

{To stick to}, to be persevering in holding to; as, to stick to a party or cause. ``The advantage will be on our side if we stick to its essentials.'' --Addison.

{To stick up}, to stand erect; as, his hair sticks up.

{To stick up for}, to assert and defend; as, to stick up for one's rights or for a friend. [Colloq.]

{To stick upon}, to dwell upon; not to forsake. ``If the matter be knotty, the mind must stop and buckle to it, and stick upon it with labor and thought.'' --Locke. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

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  • stick — Ⅰ. stick [1] ► NOUN 1) a thin piece of wood that has fallen or been cut off a tree. 2) a piece of trimmed wood used for support in walking or as a weapon. 3) (in hockey, polo, etc.) a long, thin implement used to hit or direct the ball or puck.… …   English terms dictionary

  • stick — [stik] n. [ME stikke < OE sticca, akin to Du stek, ON stik < IE base * steig , a point > STAKE, Frank * stakka, Gr stigma, L instigare, INSTIGATE] 1. a long, usually slender piece of wood; specif., a) a twig or small branch broken off or …   English World dictionary

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  • Stick — Stick, v. i. 1. To adhere; as, glue sticks to the fingers; paste sticks to the wall. [1913 Webster] The green caterpillar breedeth in the inward parts of roses not blown, where the dew sticketh. Bacon. [1913 Webster] 2. To remain where placed; to …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Stick — Stick, n. [OE. sticke, AS. sticca; akin to stician to stab, prick, pierce, G. stecken a stick, staff, OHG. steccho, Icel. stik a stick. See {Stick}, v. t..] 1. A small shoot, or branch, separated, as by a cutting, from a tree or shrub; also, any… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Stick — Stick, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Stuck}(Obs. {Sticked}); p. pr. & vb. n. {Sticking}.] [OE. stikien, v.t. & i., combined with steken, whence E. stuck), AS. stician, v.t. & i., and (assumed) stecan, v.t.; akin to OFries. steka, OS. stekan, OHG. stehhan …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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  • Stick insect — Stick Stick, n. [OE. sticke, AS. sticca; akin to stician to stab, prick, pierce, G. stecken a stick, staff, OHG. steccho, Icel. stik a stick. See {Stick}, v. t..] 1. A small shoot, or branch, separated, as by a cutting, from a tree or shrub; also …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Stick-slip phenomenon — Stick slip (or slip stick ) refers to the phenomenon of a spontaneous jerking motion that can occur while two objects are sliding over each other. Cause Stick slip is caused by the surfaces alternatingly between a sticking to each other and… …   Wikipedia

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