To turn over

To turn over
Turn Turn, v. i. 1. To move round; to have a circular motion; to revolve entirely, repeatedly, or partially; to change position, so as to face differently; to whirl or wheel round; as, a wheel turns on its axis; a spindle turns on a pivot; a man turns on his heel. [1913 Webster]

The gate . . . on golden hinges turning. --Milton. [1913 Webster]

2. Hence, to revolve as if upon a point of support; to hinge; to depend; as, the decision turns on a single fact. [1913 Webster]

Conditions of peace certainly turn upon events of war. --Swift. [1913 Webster]

3. To result or terminate; to come about; to eventuate; to issue. [1913 Webster]

If we repent seriously, submit contentedly, and serve him faithfully, afflictions shall turn to our advantage. --Wake. [1913 Webster]

4. To be deflected; to take a different direction or tendency; to be directed otherwise; to be differently applied; to be transferred; as, to turn from the road. [1913 Webster]

Turn from thy fierce wrath. --Ex. xxxii. 12. [1913 Webster]

Turn ye, turn ye from your evil ways. --Ezek. xxxiii. 11. [1913 Webster]

The understanding turns inward on itself, and reflects on its own operations. --Locke. [1913 Webster]

5. To be changed, altered, or transformed; to become transmuted; also, to become by a change or changes; to grow; as, wood turns to stone; water turns to ice; one color turns to another; to turn Mohammedan. [1913 Webster]

I hope you have no intent to turn husband. --Shak. [1913 Webster]

Cygnets from gray turn white. --Bacon. [1913 Webster]

6. To undergo the process of turning on a lathe; as, ivory turns well. [1913 Webster]

7. Specifically: [1913 Webster] (a) To become acid; to sour; -- said of milk, ale, etc. [1913 Webster] (b) To become giddy; -- said of the head or brain. [1913 Webster]

I'll look no more; Lest my brain turn. --Shak. [1913 Webster] (c) To be nauseated; -- said of the stomach. [1913 Webster] (d) To become inclined in the other direction; -- said of scales. [1913 Webster] (e) To change from ebb to flow, or from flow to ebb; -- said of the tide. [1913 Webster] (f) (Obstetrics) To bring down the feet of a child in the womb, in order to facilitate delivery. [1913 Webster]

8. (Print.) To invert a type of the same thickness, as temporary substitute for any sort which is exhausted. [1913 Webster]

{To turn about}, to face to another quarter; to turn around.

{To turn again}, to come back after going; to return. --Shak.

{To turn against}, to become unfriendly or hostile to.

{To turn aside} or {To turn away}. (a) To turn from the direct course; to withdraw from a company; to deviate. (b) To depart; to remove. (c) To avert one's face.

{To turn back}, to turn so as to go in an opposite direction; to retrace one's steps.

{To turn in}. (a) To bend inward. (b) To enter for lodgings or entertainment. (c) To go to bed. [Colloq.]

{To turn into}, to enter by making a turn; as, to turn into a side street.

{To turn off}, to be diverted; to deviate from a course; as, the road turns off to the left.

{To turn on} or {To turn upon}. (a) To turn against; to confront in hostility or anger. (b) To reply to or retort. (c) To depend on; as, the result turns on one condition.

{To turn out}. (a) To move from its place, as a bone. (b) To bend or point outward; as, his toes turn out. (c) To rise from bed. [Colloq.] (d) To come abroad; to appear; as, not many turned out to the fire. (e) To prove in the result; to issue; to result; as, the crops turned out poorly.

{To turn over}, to turn from side to side; to roll; to tumble.

{To turn round}. (a) To change position so as to face in another direction. (b) To change one's opinion; to change from one view or party to another.

{To turn to}, to apply one's self to; have recourse to; to refer to. ``Helvicus's tables may be turned to on all occasions.'' --Locke.

{To turn to account}, {profit}, {advantage}, or the like, to be made profitable or advantageous; to become worth the while.

{To turn under}, to bend, or be folded, downward or under.

{To turn up}. (a) To bend, or be doubled, upward. (b) To appear; to come to light; to transpire; to occur; to happen. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

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Look at other dictionaries:

  • turn over — {v.} 1. To roll, tip, or turn from one side to the other; overturn; upset. * /He s going to turn over the page./ * /The bike hit a rock and turned over./ 2, To think about carefully; to consider. * /He turned the problem over in his mind for… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • turn over — {v.} 1. To roll, tip, or turn from one side to the other; overturn; upset. * /He s going to turn over the page./ * /The bike hit a rock and turned over./ 2, To think about carefully; to consider. * /He turned the problem over in his mind for… …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • turn-over — ou turnover [ tɶrnɔvɶr ] n. m. • 1972; angl. turnover « rotation », de to turn over « se retourner, chavirer » ♦ Anglic. Écon. Taux de renouvellement du personnel d une entreprise. Le turn over des jeunes cadres. Des turn over, des turnovers. ♢… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • turn over a new leaf — {v. phr.} To start afresh; to have a new beginning. * / Don t be sad, Jane, Sue said. A divorce is not the end of the world. Just turn over a new leaf and you will soon be happy again. / Compare: CLEAN SLATE …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • turn over a new leaf — {v. phr.} To start afresh; to have a new beginning. * / Don t be sad, Jane, Sue said. A divorce is not the end of the world. Just turn over a new leaf and you will soon be happy again. / Compare: CLEAN SLATE …   Dictionary of American idioms

  • turn over — [v1] give, transfer assign, come across with, commend, commit, confer, confide, consign, convey, delegate, deliver, entrust, feed, find, furnish, give over, give up, hand, hand over, pass on, provide, relegate, relinquish, render, supply,… …   New thesaurus

  • turn over — /tə:rn oʊvə/, it. /tur nɔver/ (anche turn over e turnover) locuz. ingl. [comp. di turn giro, rotazione e over di nuovo ], usata in ital. come s.m. 1. (econ.) [suddivisione di un processo lavorativo in più turni di lavoro] ▶◀ [➨ turnazione]. 2.… …   Enciclopedia Italiana

  • turn (N. Amer. also roll over or turn over) in one's grave — (of a dead person) be thought of as angry or distressed about something had they been alive. → grave …   English new terms dictionary

  • turn\ over\ in\ one's\ grave — • turn (over) in one s grave v. phr. To be so grieved or angry that you would not rest quietly in your grave. If your grandfather could see what you re doing now, he would turn over in his grave …   Словарь американских идиом

  • turn over — ► turn over 1) (of an engine) start or continue to run properly. 2) (of a business) have a turnover of. 3) change or transfer custody or control of. Main Entry: ↑turn …   English terms dictionary

  • turn over something — ˌturn ˈover sth derived to do business worth a particular amount of money in a particular period of time • The company turns over £3.5 million a year. related noun ↑turnover Main entry: ↑turnderived …   Useful english dictionary

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