Intrinsic equation of a curve

Intrinsic equation of a curve
Intrinsic In*trin"sic ([i^]n*tr[i^]n"s[i^]k), a. [L. intrinsecus inward, on the inside; intra within + secus otherwise, beside; akin to E. second: cf. F. intrins[`e]que. See {Inter-}, {Second}, and cf. {Extrinsic}.] [1913 Webster] 1. Inward; internal; hence, true; genuine; real; essential; inherent; not merely apparent or accidental; -- opposed to {extrinsic}; as, the intrinsic value of gold or silver; the intrinsic merit of an action; the intrinsic worth or goodness of a person. [1913 Webster]

He was better qualified than they to estimate justly the intrinsic value of Grecian philosophy and refinement. --I. Taylor. [1913 Webster]

2. (Anat.) Included wholly within an organ or limb, as certain groups of muscles; -- opposed to {extrinsic}. [1913 Webster]

{Intrinsic energy of a body} (Physics), the work it can do in virtue of its actual condition, without any supply of energy from without.

{Intrinsic equation of a curve} (Geom.), the equation which expresses the relation which the length of a curve, measured from a given point of it, to a movable point, has to the angle which the tangent to the curve at the movable point makes with a fixed line.

{Intrinsic value}. See the Note under {Value}, n.

Syn: Inherent; innate; natural; real; genuine. [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

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  • Intrinsic equation — In geometry, an intrinsic equation of a curve is an equation that defines the curve using a relation between the curve s intrinsic properties, that is, properties that do not depend on the location and possibly the orientation of the curve.… …   Wikipedia

  • Intrinsic — In*trin sic ([i^]n*tr[i^]n s[i^]k), a. [L. intrinsecus inward, on the inside; intra within + secus otherwise, beside; akin to E. second: cf. F. intrins[ e]que. See {Inter }, {Second}, and cf. {Extrinsic}.] [1913 Webster] 1. Inward; internal;… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Intrinsic energy of a body — Intrinsic In*trin sic ([i^]n*tr[i^]n s[i^]k), a. [L. intrinsecus inward, on the inside; intra within + secus otherwise, beside; akin to E. second: cf. F. intrins[ e]que. See {Inter }, {Second}, and cf. {Extrinsic}.] [1913 Webster] 1. Inward;… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Intrinsic value — Intrinsic In*trin sic ([i^]n*tr[i^]n s[i^]k), a. [L. intrinsecus inward, on the inside; intra within + secus otherwise, beside; akin to E. second: cf. F. intrins[ e]que. See {Inter }, {Second}, and cf. {Extrinsic}.] [1913 Webster] 1. Inward;… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

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