To wear on

To wear on
Wear Wear, v. t. [imp. {Wore} (w[=o]r); p. p. {Worn} (w[=o]rn); p. pr. & vb. n. {Wearing}. Before the 15th century wear was a weak verb, the imp. & p. p. being {Weared}.] [OE. weren, werien, AS. werian to carry, to wear, as arms or clothes; akin to OHG. werien, weren, to clothe, Goth. wasjan, L. vestis clothing, vestire to clothe, Gr. "enny`nai, Skr. vas. Cf. {Vest}.] [1913 Webster] 1. To carry or bear upon the person; to bear upon one's self, as an article of clothing, decoration, warfare, bondage, etc.; to have appendant to one's body; to have on; as, to wear a coat; to wear a shackle. [1913 Webster]

What compass will you wear your farthingale? --Shak. [1913 Webster]

On her white breast a sparkling cross she wore, Which Jews might kiss, and infidels adore. --Pope. [1913 Webster]

2. To have or exhibit an appearance of, as an aspect or manner; to bear; as, she wears a smile on her countenance. ``He wears the rose of youth upon him.'' --Shak. [1913 Webster]

His innocent gestures wear A meaning half divine. --Keble. [1913 Webster]

3. To use up by carrying or having upon one's self; hence, to consume by use; to waste; to use up; as, to wear clothes rapidly. [1913 Webster]

4. To impair, waste, or diminish, by continual attrition, scraping, percussion, on the like; to consume gradually; to cause to lower or disappear; to spend. [1913 Webster]

That wicked wight his days doth wear. --Spenser. [1913 Webster]

The waters wear the stones. --Job xiv. 19. [1913 Webster]

5. To cause or make by friction or wasting; as, to wear a channel; to wear a hole. [1913 Webster]

6. To form or shape by, or as by, attrition. [1913 Webster]

Trials wear us into a liking of what, possibly, in the first essay, displeased us. --Locke. [1913 Webster]

{To wear away}, to consume; to impair, diminish, or destroy, by gradual attrition or decay.

{To wear off}, to diminish or remove by attrition or slow decay; as, to wear off the nap of cloth.

{To wear on} or {To wear upon}, to wear. [Obs.] ``[I] weared upon my gay scarlet gites [gowns.]'' --Chaucer.

{To wear out}. (a) To consume, or render useless, by attrition or decay; as, to wear out a coat or a book. (b) To consume tediously. ``To wear out miserable days.'' --Milton. (c) To harass; to tire. ``[He] shall wear out the saints of the Most High.'' --Dan vii. 25. (d) To waste the strength of; as, an old man worn out in military service.

{To wear the breeches}. See under {Breeches}. [Colloq.] [1913 Webster]


The Collaborative International Dictionary of English. 2000.

Look at other dictionaries:

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  • wear — wear1 [wer] vt. wore, worn, wearing [ME weren < OE werian, akin to ON verja, Goth wasjan, to clothe < IE base * wes , to clothe > Sans vastra , L vestis, clothing, vestire, to clothe] 1. a) to have on the body or carry on the person… …   English World dictionary

  • wear — [weə ǁ wer] noun ( fair) wear and tear INSURANCE the amount of damage that can be expected to affect a product or property in normal use. Wear and tear is often taken into consideration by an insurance company when paying an insurance claim: •… …   Financial and business terms

  • Wear Sunscreen — or Sunscreen Speech [ [http://www.discogs.com/viewimages?what=R obid=476994 View Images ] ] are the common names of an essay actually called Advice, like youth, probably just wasted on the young written by Mary Schmich and published in the… …   Wikipedia

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  • Wear — Wear, v. i. 1. To endure or suffer use; to last under employment; to bear the consequences of use, as waste, consumption, or attrition; as, a coat wears well or ill; hence, sometimes applied to character, qualifications, etc.; as, a man wears… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • wear — [n] use, corrosion abrasion, attrition, damage, depreciation, deterioration, dilapidation, diminution, disappearance, employment, erosion, friction, impairment, inroads, loss, mileage, service, usefulness, utility, waste, wear and tear; concepts… …   New thesaurus

  • Wear (disambiguation) — * Wear is the erosion of material from a solid surface by the action of another material. * The River Wear is a river located in the North East England, and gives its name to the regions Weardale, Wearside and the Metropolitan County Tyne Wear. * …   Wikipedia

  • wear — ► VERB (past wore; past part. worn) 1) have on one s body as clothing, decoration, or protection. 2) exhibit or present (a particular facial expression or appearance). 3) damage or destroy or suffer damage or destruction by friction or use. 4)… …   English terms dictionary

  • wear out — {v.} 1a. To use or wear until useless. * /Bobby got a toy truck that would run on a battery, and he used it so much that he soon wore it out./ * /The stockings are so worn out that they can t be mended any more./ Compare: GIVE OUT(4), USE UP. 1b …   Dictionary of American idioms

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